English 1: T11BF/ TR2H – Writing Composition

Tanya Pollard

T,TH 11:00-12:15PM 3405 B

T,TH 02:15-03:30PM 2231 B

e-mail: Tpollard@brooklyn.cuny.edu

website: http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/tpollard

Office: 3108 Boylan

phone: 718-951-5000 x6216

hours: TR 12:15-1:00, 3:30-4:15, and by appointment

TR11 recipes TR2H recipes

Week

Date

Reading

1

9-1

Introduction

 

9-3

Barack Obama, Dreams from My Father

2

9-8

1st essay due; What is authentic? Obama, Dreams from My Father

 

9-10

Revision workshop

3

9-15

Revised 1st essay due. Alfred Kazin, from A Walker in the City, pp. 30-34 (From "On Belmont Avenue" to "solid")

http://books.google.com/books?id=2VeIfg9Q5DkC&printsec=frontcover&dq=alfred+kazin+a+walker+in+the+city#v=onepage&q=&f=false

 

9-17

Gary Shteyngart, "Sixty-nine Cents,” http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/09/03/070903fa_fact_shteyngart

Calvin Trillin, “Local Bounty: Grandfather knows best,”

http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2003/01/20/030120fa_fact?currentPage=all

4

9-22

2nd essay due: What do you eat, and why? Writing workshop.

 

9-24

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “Real Food,” http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/09/03/070903fa_fact_adichie

Edwige Danticat, “Crabs,” http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/06/09/080609fa_fact_danticat

5

9-29

no class (Monday conversion day)

 

10-1

Revised 2nd essay due; Gaye Tuchman & Harry G. Levine, “Safe Treyf: New York Jews and Chinese Food,” http://dragon.soc.qc.cuny.edu/Staff/levine/SAFE-TREYF.pdf

6

10-6

Peter Singer, “Vegetarianism,” http://www.utilitarian.net/singer/by/1995----02.htm

Laura Fraser, “Why I stopped being a vegetarian,” http://archive.salon.com/travel/food/feature/2000/01/07/vegetarian/index.html

 

10-8

3rd essay due: What don’t you eat, and why? Writing workshop

7

10-13

Laura Fraser, “Why it's rude to diet in public,”http://atomise.livejournal.com/79507.html#cutid1

Jeffrey Steingarten, “The Omnivore: Learning to eat everything” http://www.slate.com/id/3152/

 

10-15

revised 3rd essay due, David Sedaris, “Tasteless,” http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/09/03/070903fa_fact_sedaris

8

10-20

Taras Grescoe, “Sardine With Your Bagel?”, http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/09/opinion/09grescoe.html?pagewanted=1

Nicholas Kristof, “Food for the Soul,”

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/opinion/23kristof.html?scp=6&sq=food&st=cse

 

10-22

4th essay due: Compare and contrast two articles. Writing workshop.

9

10-27

11:00 class: meet in Library, room 120, for Library Orientation Program

2:15 class: David Foster Wallace, "Consider the Lobster" http://www.gourmet.com/magazine/2000s/2004/08/consider_the_lobster

 

10-29

Revised 4th essay due

11:00 class: David Foster Wallace, "Consider the Lobster" http://www.gourmet.com/magazine/2000s/2004/08/consider_the_lobster

2:15 class: meet in Library, room 120, for Library Orientation Program

10

11-3

Michael Pollan, “Unhappy Meals,” http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/magazine/28nutritionism.t.html?ref=books

 

11-5

5th essay due: Compare and contrast two articles. Writing workshop.

11

11-10

Eric Schlosser, “Fast-Food Nation: The True Cost Of America's Diet,”

http://www.mcspotlight.org/media/press/rollingstone1.html

 

11-12

Robin Pagnamenta, "Climate chief Lord Stern: give up meat to save the planet"

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article6891362.ece?print=yes&randnum=1256813495794

Nicolette Hahn Niman, "The Carnivore’s Dilemma"

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/31/opinion/31niman.html?_r=1&sq=carnivore&st=cse&%2339;s%20dilemma=&scp=1&pagewanted=all

Optional (lengthy) additional reading for those who are interested: Michael Specter, “"Big Foot"”

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/02/25/080225fa_fact_specter

Revised 5th essay due

12

11-17

Elizabeth Kolbert, “"Why are we so fat?"”

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2009/07/20/090720crbo_books_kolbert?currentPage=all

Eric Wilson, “"When Is Thin Too Thin?"

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/21/fashion/21MODELS.html?pagewanted=1

 

11-19

6th essay due: argument: what should we eat and why?, with reference to two articles we've read this semester. Writing workshop

13

11-24

Michael Pollan, “"Out of the Kitchen, Onto the Couch,"” http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/02/magazine/02cooking-t.html?_r=1&emc=eta1

Jody Rudoren, “"On This Cooking Challenge, Reality Bites,"

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/03/nyregion/long-island/03Rhome.html?fta=y

1-3 recipes due for class cookbook

 

11-26

no class (Thanksgiving)

14

12-1

preparation for practice-exam

Revised 6th essay due

 

12-3

practice exam

15

12-8

discussion of practice exam, exam preparation

 

12-10

Overview, portfolios due

 16

12-15

Exit exam (10:30-12:30)

Course Description, Requirements, and Expectations:

Description: In this class, we will work to improve expository writing through reading, analyzing, writing, and revising essays. We will write and revise six essays as well as various informal assignments and, as part of a learning community with two other classes, we will also work on your essays for these other classes. In order to find common ground for discussion and writing, we’ll focus on a topic we all have in common: food

Attendance is required. If you miss more than three classes, you will fail the class: this is a college-wide rule for this course. Lateness will count as a partial absence. If you miss class on a date when an essay is due, you are still responsible for submitting the essay on time, either by e-mail (followed with a hard copy) or through another student.

Texts: The only text you need to purchase for this class is Diana Hacker’s A Writer’s Reference, available at both the campus bookstore and Shakespeare & Co. You should already own Barack Obama’s Dreams from My Father (from the Freshman Common Reading), and all other readings are available on the internet. You can find them either by typing in the websites printed above, or (more easily) by going to our class page on my website. Be sure to find and print them early to avoid last-minute problems. You must bring a copy of the reading with you to class.

Participation: Learning is a collaborative process, and it is important that each of you engage fully with the texts and with each other. To this end, I will expect you to participate actively in class discussions, and your contributions will determine part of your final grade. In order to build a classroom atmosphere of courtesy and concentration, please avoid behavior that is disrespectful and interferes with others’ learning, including rudeness, talking while others are speaking, and ringing from cell-phones, pagers, watches, etc.

Written work must be typed, with one-inch margins and a twelve-point standard font. You should focus on building and supporting an argument, and writing clearly. Late papers will be marked down for each day late; all assignments must be completed in order to pass the course. Any use of others’ ideas must be fully acknowledged in footnotes; see me if you are unsure about what this means. Plagiarism will result in failing the class and being reported to the Dean’s Office.

Coursework and grading:

 

essays and revisions

portfolio

participation and informal writing assignments

60% (10% each)

20%

20%

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