English 509: Shakespeare's Comedies

Tanya Pollard
Bibliography
Dickson 113

M 5:30-8

my web page: http://chss.montclair.edu/~pollardt/

English department web page: http://english.montclair.edu

Office: Dickson 352

phone: 655-5141

hours: M 12:30-1 & 3:45-5:15, R 12-1, and by appointment

pollardt@mail.montclair.edu

Week Date Reading
1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

1-23

1-30

2-6

2-13

2-20

2-27

3-6

3-20

3-27

4-3

4-10

4-17

4-24

5-1

Introduction, Midsummer Night's Dream

Midsummer Night's Dream

Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It

As You Like It

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night

Twelfth Night

Measure for Measure

Measure for Measure, All's Well that Ends Well

All's Well that Ends Well

Cymbeline

Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale

Cymbeline, The Tempest

The Tempest, overview; final essay due

Course Requirements and Expectations:
Attendance

Attendance is required. If you miss more than two classes, your overall grade will drop; at four absences, you will fail the class. Arriving late to class will count as a partial absence.

Texts

Because this class is based on close reading of Shakespeare's plays, it is very important that everyone has a copy of the play and brings it to class. You may use any edition, and if purchasing the text is a problem, there should be plenty of Shakespeare texts in the library. If you forget your copy, stop by the library and check out a copy on the way to class.

Assignments

Your primary assignment is to read each play carefully, and to arrive in class prepared for lively discussion. You will also be asked to read and engage with criticism of the plays: brief excerpts included in the Signet editions, as well as some of the articles listed in the bibliography for this course. For written work, you will be required to submit a brief (one-page) written response each week on any aspect of the play under discussion. Over the course of the semester, your responses should discuss at least three articles from the bibliography (and/or others, chosen in consultation with me). Lastly, you will be writing a term paper, informed by secondary research.

Participation

Learning is a collaborative process, and it is crucial that each of you engage fully with the texts and with each other. To this end, you will be expected to participate actively in class discussions, and you will be required to provide and introduce topics for class discussion on a rotating basis. Your contributions will determine a significant portion of the semester's grade. In order to build a classroom atmosphere of courtesy and concentration, please avoid behavior that is disrespectful and interferes with others' learning, including rudeness, talking while others are speaking, and ringing from cell-phones, pagers, watches, etc.

Writing

Written work should have a thesis that is well argued, clearly written, and supported by analytical close readings of textual passages. Papers should be typed, double-spaced, in a 12-point font, with one-inch margins on all sides. Weekly response papers are intended as preparation for class discussion, and will not be accepted late; if you have trouble with printing, e-mail them to me before class and follow up with a hard copy as soon as possible. For the final essay, lateness will result in lowering of the grade. Any use of others' ideas must be fully acknowledged in footnotes; speak to me if you are unsure about what this means. Plagiarism is extremely serious, and will result in failing the class and being reported to the Dean's Office.

Coursework and grading:
Participation in class discussion and contribution of topics

Weekly written responses

Final research paper

25%

25%

50%

Return to Tanya Pollard's website